QNAP warns of new bugs in its Network Attached Storage devices – Naked Security

QNAP, the makers of Networked Attached Storage (NAS) devices that are especially popular with home and small business users, has issued a warning about not-yet-patched bugs in the company’s products.

Home and small office NAS devices, which typically range in size from that of a small dictionary to that of a large encyclopedia, provide you with the ready-to-go convenience of cloud storage, but in the custodial comfort of your own network.

Loosely speaking, a NAS device is like an old-school file server that connects directly to your LAN, so it’s accessible and usable even if your internet connection is slow or broken.

Unlike an old-school file server, however, the operating system and file-serving software are preinstalled and preconfigured for you, as part of the device, so it Just Works.

No need to learn how to install Linux and Samba, or to wrangle with Windows Server licenses, or to specify and build a server of your own and administer it.

NAS boxes typically come with everything you need (or with disk slots into which you add your own commodity disk drives of a suitable capacity), so you need to do little more than plug a power lead into the NAS, and hook up a network cable from the NAS to your router.

No need to buy a USB drive for every laptop and desktop you own, because the NAS can be shared, and used simultaneously, by all the devices on your LAN.

Configuring and managing the NAS can be done from any computer on your network, using a web browser to talk to a dedicated web server that’s ready and waiting on the NAS itself.

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